Museum of the Origins of Man



ZOOMORPHIC AND ANTHROPOMORPHIC PAINTINGS ON PLASTER WALLS IN THE POST-PALEOLITHIC






Fig. F51) Bull, a hunting scene.
Copy of painting on plaster.
Catalhoyuk Museum, Turkey .
Sixth millennium BC.
Two-dimensional art, a Mesolithic tradition in oriental civilizations.
The bull, a divinity, had not yet been domesticated, therefore this hunt scene could be interpreted as depicting the bull as protector of the hunt, positioned upfront for that reason.
The cult of the bull is found again in southern France, on the border with Italy at Monte Bego, 50 miles east of Nice, France. Here we find rock carvings (two-dimensional art) at about 8,000 feet and dated around 3,800 to 3,600 years ago (the Bronze Age). There are more than 100,000 images cut into the rock. For the most part they are bulls' heads, engraved in a highly simplified style, with an almost triangular head and long horns.


Fig. F52) Two leopards facing each other in combat.
This is a religious subject in an extinct religion.
Catalhoyuk Museum, Catalhoyuk, Turkey.
Sixth millennium BC. This painting is a reproduction of the original which is on display at the Museum of Anatolian Civilizations, at Ankara, Turkey.
Observe how the leopards are decorated with fourth or five-pointed stars. It is probable that this type of star had a religious significance.






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